💨 Hornby Steam Generator Fitted 'Flying Scotsman' In Stock Now

Posted by Jack Morgan on

Hornby A3

Hornby now produce a special version of the iconic LNER Class A3 4-6-2 'Flying Scotsman' steam locomotive, complete with a pre-fitted steam generator, digital sound and other advanced features!


Bring home this model of one of the world's most famous locomotives to your layout and enjoy the new features never before seen on this model in ready to run.

In Stock Now

Product Features

Highly detailed model with separately fitted parts including handrails, pipework, lamp irons, underframe relief, footsteps and more

Diecast footplate

5-pole motor with flywheel

Digital sound pre-fitted with Hornby Triplex Sound decoder - suitable for use with the HM7000 system

Working steam generator pre-fitted which emits clouds of steam from the locomotive's chimney

Working firebox flicker effect

NEM tension lock couplings

Prototype Information

4472 IRL
Image by Michael J Irlam

The London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) Gresley Classes A1 and A3 locomotives represented two distinct stages in the history of the British 4-6-2 "Pacific" steam locomotives designed by Nigel Gresley. 


They were designed for main line passenger services, initially on the Great Northern Railway (GNR), a constituent company of the London and North Eastern Railway after the amalgamation of 1923, for which they became a standard design. 


The change in class designation to A3 reflected the fitting to the same chassis of a higher pressure boiler with a greater superheating surface and a small reduction in cylinder diameter, leading to an increase in locomotive weight. Eventually all of the A1 locomotives were rebuilt, most to A3 specifications, but no. 4470 was completely rebuilt as Class A1/1. 


The names for the locomotives came from a variety of sources. The first, Great Northern, was named after its parent company. Others were given the names of high-ranking railway officials, but most were given the names of famous racehorses. 


One was named after the company's most famous long-distance passenger train, the Flying Scotsman. Flying Scotsman is the sole survivor of the class to be preserved.


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